Eric Cruikshank, 19-2016, Oil on two boards; 40,5 cm x 122 cm

Ian Kane and Eric Cruikshank – September 2016

Ian Kane

Ian Kane is a spatial artist working from his studio in Dalcross, near Inverness in the Scottish Highlands. He has exhibited nationally and internationally since studying Sculpture at Edinburgh College of Art and completing a post-graduate degree in the 1970s. A Scottish Young Contemporaries Prize-winner in 1984, his works have been shown in the UK, Belgium, Netherlands, France, Norway, Canada and Japan.

Ian Kane, Seeing is believing

Ian Kane, Seeing is believing

 

‘Curiosity and the spirit of enquiry into what exists is always the starting point for the work. This preoccupation with reflecting the truth of the world and our place in it is the work of the artist. The work changes as we ourselves change. The artist strives to find ways to produce the works that become signifiers of our time. The making of every piece is a re-learning; the bringing together of the conscious and the unconscious. Memory does not help here as the presentness of the work generates its own problems to be resolved’

https://spark.adobe.com/page/wcrwajr059abC/

 

Eric Cruikshank

As to the situation of the colours, the purest and strongest must be placed in front of the piece, and the colouring varied according to subject, time and place. If the subject be grave, melancholy or terrible, the general tint of the colouring must incline to brown or black, or red and gloomy; but it must be gay and pleasant in subjects of joy or triumph.

Encyclopedia Britannica or A Dictionary of Arts and Sciences, edited by William Smellie, Edinburgh 1771

Eric Cruikshank  Number 9 -  Deep-Scarlet-Red-Pomplean-Red; 2016 Coloured Pencil on Paper, 19 cm x 28cm

Eric Cruikshank Number 9 – Deep-Scarlet-Red-Pomplean-Red; 2016 Coloured Pencil on Paper, 19 cm x 28cm

The Scottish artist Eric Cruikshank is a modern painter. Born in a country and into a culture with a strong narrative tradition, his work departs from customary figuration, yet revels in the craft and artisanship of his chosen medium. Instead of portraying famous men, it analyses the qualities of colour and light. Instead of imitating landscapes, it explores notions of painterly space. And instead of illustrating stories, it investigates the process of painting itself. More than anything, this approach relies on the individual viewer. Our perceptions of colour, light and space are not only dependent on the painting – they are just as much dependent on the conditions in which we perceive it. Changes in lighting, spatial arrangement, distance to the object, subjective mood of the beholder and even the time spent with the artwork, become constituting factors in understanding it. Instead of a mere consumer of a pre-packaged story, the beholder becomes participant observer.

 

Eric Cruikshank, Number 3; Light-Yellow-Glaze-Warm-Grey-II; 2016, Coloured Pencil on Paper; 19cm 28 cm.

Eric Cruikshank, Number 3; Light-Yellow-Glaze-Warm-Grey-II; 2016, Coloured Pencil on Paper; 19cm 28 cm.

Cruik-Kane mix image

CONTINUUM – Eric Cruikshank & Ian Kane- September 2016

Announcing the upcoming show with painter Eric Cruikshank and sculptor Ian Kane.

16.09 – 24.09.2016                                                                                                                                           Preview Thursday 15.09.2016               from 6 pm                                                                                     Opening times                                         Saturdays  2 – 6 pm                                                                                                                                        Mo – Fri.  by appointment                                                                                                                              T- 0207 2676267

 

Eric Cruikshank, Untitled, 2016

Eric Cruikshank, Untitled, 2016

Both artists are based in Scotland and have previously exhibited together.  In ‘Continuum’ we will see new works amongst other aspects shaped by the Scottish landscape and light.

Ian Kane, Seeing is believing

Ian Kane, Seeing is believing

Ian Kane

http://www.iankaneartist.com

The artist is a collector; fragments of seeing, ideas, observations, experience, accumulated knowledge eventually come together to form a visual reality.

The making of every piece is a re-learning, the bringing together of the conscious and the unconscious. Memory does not help here as the present (ness) of the work generates its own immediate problems to be resolved.

"work-will-set-you-free" , 2016

Ian Kane ,”work-will-set-you-free” , 2016

Curiosity and the spirit of enquiry into what exists is always the starting point of my work. This preoccupation with reflecting the truth of the world and our place in it is the work of the artist. The work changes as we ourselves change. The artist strives to find ways to produce works that become signifiers of our time. For me this process is constant research, the outcome becomes the work.

CONTINUUM RAUMX

My work tends to be contemplative in nature as a result of living in the landscape of the Scottish Highlands. I feel that this influence is in the mix giving the work a poetic quality.

Ian Kane

Ian Kane, Complete,2016

‘Complete’

The flat floor work started as a piece of plywood shuttering, which I found as flotsam on the banks of the Moray Firth. The white part, made from epoxy, exactly completes the work in every detail while still allowing difference. The work ever so slightly hovers above the floor.

‘Above and Below’

This piece is carved from a piece of cherry wood and is very precarious given the weight of the wood on top.

‘Work Will Set You Free’

The last floor work adds a note of humour to the show being a truly ridiculous object. The wheels are made of sandstone and the natural form that holds them in place is a piece of sycamore encased with resin. Although sycamore trees are seen often as weeds harp makers prize the wood.

Seeing is Believing’

The ‘Seeing is Believing’ piece has at its core a knowingness and an unknowingness, we know what the red covers but we also do not know. We see but we do not allow ourselves to believe.

 

Eric Cruikshank

http://www.ericcruikshank.com/

Untitled, 2016, Oil on Two Boards, 91.5cm x 156cm (with split).

Eric Cruikshank, Untitled, 2016 Oil on two Boards, 91.5 cm x 156 cm ( with split)

Eric Cruikshank, Untitled, 2016

Eric Cruikshank, Untitled, 2016

 

Taking landscape as an initial starting point, my paintings are not about literal presentation; instead the focus is on the emotive qualities of place. Using an objective palette tied to the Scottish landscape, colour acts as a vehicle to reveal the picture planes underlying points of reference. With the structure, design, and colour harmony being grounded in the everyday, the viewer is encouraged to readdress notions of their surroundings, where the familiar is opened up and made full of possibility.

With the works coming out of the territory of traditional art and values, through process and presentation, a dialogue opens up between the past and present, the historical and the contemporary. Despite an allusion to the social, spiritual and material contexts within the field of my art, the principal criteria always come back to the base construct elements. Shape, colour, and surface build the foundational support and elevate the works concepts, allowing the viewer to uncover layers of potential meaning as each element is considered. In the absence of imagery or narrative, the panels are left open to interpretation, as an almost blank plane to reflect the viewers own emotions and ideas.

By applying the paint in thinly layered colour bands, and utilising a subtraction technique, the surface is worked until a balance is reached. The delicate forms that remain give the effect of a monochromatic finish when first viewed. Through the resulting veil of paint, shimmering traces of tone flicker on the edge of focus, where the surface holds the gentlest luminosity and modulating volume. The works are completed with a meticulous level of control, creating a plane that bears no brush marks, removing evidence of the hand of the artist and any imprint of technique. With this removal, the colour field comes under closer scrutiny – on approaching the work, colour pulses in constantly shifting patterns, on withdrawing, these patterns blend, bleed and fuse into a vibrant continuous field, inviting a highly tuned visual attentiveness. The refined shade and contour lead the eye around the piece, gently engaging the viewer in the act of seeing, where their relationship with the work is one of continual change, as the ethereal surface vibrates with an inner light and rhythm that appears to expand outwards beyond the border, activating the space around and between the pieces

 

Martin Streit and Peter Abrahams, installation, Raum X London, July 2016

Peter Abrahams – Martin Streit, paintings and photography

Installation views RAUMX London    8.07 – 16.07.2016

opening times Saturday 2 – 6pm

and by appointment

raumx@mgeccelli1.plus.com

Preview – Thursday 7.07.2016

from 6 pm

Martin Streit and Peter Abrahams, installation, Raum X London, July 2016

Martin Streit and Peter Abrahams, installation, Raum X London, July 2016

Martin Streit and Peter Abrahams, installation, Raum X London, July 2016

Martin Streit and Peter Abrahams, installation, Raum X London, July 2016

Martin Streit and Peter Abrahams, installation, Raum X London, July 2016

Martin Streit and Peter Abrahams, installation, Raum X London, July 2016

Martin Streit and Peter Abrahams, installation, Raum X London, July 2016

Martin Streit and Peter Abrahams, installation, Raum X London, July 2016

Martin Streit and Peter Abrahams, installation, Raum X London, July 2016

Martin Streit and Peter Abrahams, installation, Raum X London, July 2016

Martin Streit and Peter Abrahams, installation, Raum X London, July 2016

Martin Streit and Peter Abrahams, installation, Raum X London, July 2016

Martin Streit and Peter Abrahams – Photographs and Paintings ; Preview Thursday 07.07.2016

RAUMXwebsiteInvite-page-001

Martin Streit (Cologne) and Peter Abrahams (London) are both visual based artists. Both have worked extensively in the fields of painting, photography and drawing.

On the paintings of Martin Streit, the motif present in his images is relatively unspectacular. The arsenal of objects upon which Streit plays out his artistic ambitions consists of balls, bowls, figures and architecture. Similarly to Streit, Abrahams has been involved in a photographic scrutiny of common objects and substances for almost ten years. The materials in question have been acquired in charity shops and pound stores, found at the side of the road and stumbled upon in common areas of studio buildings.

There is a dialogue between looking, performing and recording in both artists work. While Streit both in his paintings and photographs allows colour and light to transform bodies and objects. Especially in his Camera Obscura photographs bodies and objects change their appearance and solid structures are transformed into biomorphic phenomena. Abrahams’ still-life genre is peculiar in that the artist can move the objects around and so manipulate the subject, as well as alter the composition through changing the viewpoint. This is a meditative procedure and akin to the creative process itself – liable to overwork, self-consciousness, sketchiness or a rare, unpredictable profundity.

At the same time, Martin’s dispute between painting and photography brings back memories of reality and simultaneously evades any kind of realistic representation. His paintings offer their own truth; a truth that reinvents itself each instance of viewing.

www.peterabrahams.eu
www.martinstreit.net

Untitled

Peter Abrahams

Untitled

Peter Abrahams

Martin Streit

Martin Streit

Martin Streit

Martin Streit

 

 

 

 

Philipp Dorl -Slit-back

In and Out – spatial correspondence – Preview Thursday 19.05.2016 from 6 pm

Such places do not exist and , because they do not exist,

space is turned in to a question,

ceases to be a certainty, ceases to be integrated

and ceases to be appropriated.

Space is doubt: I have constantly to mark it, to

define it. It’s never mine, never given to me,

I have to conquer it.

 

Georges Perec.

inandoutfinal-mail version2

In and Out – spatial correspondence – RAUMX forthcoming group show on lens based art May 2016

In and out5-hoch Thursday

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The exhibition In and Out – spatial correspondences- is primarily presenting photographic positions dealing with the question of the factual and the actual.

To what extent can a photograph embody  characteristics of sculpture or painting?When does the photograph become the medium for painterly or sculptural strategies and vice versa? This theme  is illuminated from different angles by using some real objects and sculptures which are placed between surface and space .

Philipp Dorl -Slit-back

Philipp Dorl ,Slit-back

 

 

 

Martina Geccelli,  Stone 2. 2015

Martina Geccelli,
Stone 2. 2015

Darren Harvey -Regan,  The Erratics 10

Darren Harvey -Regan,
The Erratics 10

Tamara Lorenz, Rot1

Tamara Lorenz,
Rot1

Michael Moerk, White

Michael Moerk,
White

David penny, Do you think it will be like this forever, 2016

David Penny,
Do you think it will be like this forever, 2016

 

 

 

 

 

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Nancy Murphy Spicer – more than momentary: ENJOY

Installation shots from Preview Thursday 5.11.2015Hanging Drawing (20 successive drawings, unique and unrehearsed), 2015, lead, rubber, acrylic, hardware, dimensions variable
Hanging Drawing (20 successive drawings, unique and unrehearsed), 2015, lead, rubber, acrylic, hardware, dimensions variable

IMG_2170

 

 

 

 

 

More than momentary: ENJOY, 2015 Installation view with 21 drawings.

More than momentary: ENJOY, 2015 Installation view with 21 drawings. (gesso, gouache and acrylic with collage on rice paper)

 

more than momentary: ENJOY alters the typical path of artwork from studio to gallery to collector by offering voluntary participants the opportunity to borrow and spend extended time with the work BEFORE the exhibition. In the spirit of Lewis Hyde’s ideas about art as a gift, I offer this time with the work as a gift, as a way of opening up the possibilities for relating to the work in a way that is more than momentary. The choice of the wordENJOY in the title refers to the secondary meaning of the word: “to possess or benefit from.”

Nancy Murphy Spicer, 2015

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Disrupted Drawing Large, 2015, gesso, gouache and acrylic with collage on rice paper,

IMG_2171

Disrupted Drawing, 2015

 

12191087_10206704382101572_3860975286928581005_o

Hanging Drawing, participatory performance, 2015

 

RAUMXinvitation_n.murpys

Nancy Murphy Spicer – more than momentary: ENJOY

Disrupted Drawing Small 50, 2015 gouache +acrylic with collage on rice paper, 46.5 x 48,5cm

Disrupted Drawing
Small 50, 2015
gouache +acrylic with collage on rice paper, 46.5 x 48,5cm

 

Disrupted Drawing Small 50 ; in situ

Disrupted Drawing Small 50 ; in situ

“When you are in the groove, the work is telling you what it wants. It’s about what the work wants.” — Richard Tuttle

”A work of art can survive without the market, but where there is no gift, there is no art.” — Lewis Hyde, The Gift

 

 

 

 

 

Nancy Murphy Spicer’s works are physical and collaborative drawings and performances which activate social, architectural and geographic space. Her work poses questions such as what is the nature of beauty, who creates it, and how do we notice the moment when art occurs.

For the RaumX exhibtion, Murphy Spicer presents a series of works on paper, a drawing installation and an artists book documenting a participatory, curatorial project.

Nancy Murphy Spicer’s Disrupted Drawings prize an intentionally casual process. In creating them, assumptions about the final work are set aside and the generously built surface reveals the narrative of the making. Rice paper, acrylic and gouache come together in a drawing object that encompasses painting, sculpture and drawing.

In the spirit of Lewis Hyde’s ideas about art as a gift, Murphy Spicer initiated a participatory, curatorial project for her exhibition at RaumX entitled more than momentary: ENJOY. She enaged an international group of 23 volunteers to borrow and spend extended time with the Disrupted Drawings before the exhibition. It was her intention that, with this temporary possession of the work, participants would derive pleasures and benefits that surpass the typically brief exhibition and/or online viewing experience. An artists book documents the project in photos and text and will be on view at RaumX.

Murphy Spicer’s Hanging Drawing 2 (20 successive drawings unique and unrehearsed) is dependent on a slightly different “gift” scenario. In this work, beholders engage with the work to create a series of drawings using the substantial, dimensional line that comprises the work. Made of lead, rubber, and paint, the line hangs on the wall, draped across a series of small hooks, its weight creating catenary arcs toward the floor. A set of simple instructions is provided as guidelines for engagement. At the RaumX opening, a selected group of individuals will perform the work, each making their unique set of twenty fleeting drawings.

American artist Nancy Murphy Spicer, formerly based in London, lives and works in Charlottesville, Virginia, USA.

Her work is represented by Carroll and Sons, Boston, Massachusetts.

www.murphyspicer.com

www.carrollandsons.net/artists/spicer/

Hanging Drawing, 20 successive drawings , unique and unrehearsed, 2015. Lead,rubber,acrylic, hardware; dimensions variable

Hanging Drawing, 20 successive drawings , unique and unrehearsed, 2015. Lead,rubber,acrylic, hardware; dimensions variable

Hanging Drawing, 2015 (as above)

Hanging Drawing, 2015
(as above)