Mary Maclean and Jo McGonigal – September 2017

Mary Maclean, Campus #7

Mary Maclean 

Mary Maclean’s work in photography explores the intersections of spatial thought and the flux of things that are always on the move, even if captured in the apparently implacable, static, objecthood of the image. She is founder member of the curating group Outside Architecture and was a member of the collaborative artists project Five Years 2010 -2015. She is currently Senior Lecturer at the Royal Academy Schools.

Mary Maclean, Left of Place, A photographic installation exploring the space of borders and thresholds in the everyday structures within architectural environments.

Mary Maclean, Non-Coincidence

 

Mary Maclean, Outcomes may Vary # 1

 

 

 

Jo McGonigal

Jo McGonigal
Side (cadmium yellow deep) 2016

Jo McGonigal, Dirty Gold, 2016
(Lycra, pigment,wood)

Jo McGonigal  makes spatial paintings out of physical things in real space. The work begins with a visual analysis of historical Baroque painting (e.g. Poussin, Vermeer, etc.) as a basis for understanding painting, not as a fixed identity but as a specific spatial construction with a pictorial and spatial vocabulary. These observations became translated through the construction of three-dimensional spatial paintings as pictorial compositions that reconfigure the space and its architecture, using specific physical things. The exhibition space evolves the work through its spatial characteristics.  In using materials to imply formal and conceptual qualities of transparency, light, opacity, verticality, proximity, distance, McGonigal is dealing with in how they are used a vernacular of painting.

Jo McGonigal,
Close Looking (2015)
Oil on Lycra and Wood
35 x 10 x 7 cm

Jo McGonigal, Rectangles (2015)
Edge of a Silk Scarf / Perspex

Off the Wall – installation views

View into the studio space with left S. Callery -K. Finklea-S.Dannenberg (right)

H.Ardila ( left) -Kevin Finklea (right)

RAUMX-Letftpartly seen Deb Covell-Simon Callery (middle)-Katrin Bremermann

Katrin Bremermann, 2017(left- Sebastian Dannenberg, Ellis Portable ,2017 (right)

Sebastian Dannenberg, Ellis Portable, 2017

S.Dannenberg, Volume Up, 2017

Hernan Ardila, Untitled, 2016 (left) -Deb Covell, Tightfit, 2016

Deb Covell, Tightfit.2016 ( (wall), partly seen Deb Covell Shroud, 2017

Deb Covell, Shroud, 2017- Simon Callery, Three Piece Leaning Wallpit Painting, 2014

Off the Wall – painting and object – 07.07 until 22.7.2017 , Preview Thursday 6.07.2017 from 6pm

Off the Wall came about as a response to problems or questions I have about my own work. Issues around the edge, the relationship between the surface, form, the support and the question, when does a painting become an object?

Although I have not completely let go of the image or frame in my own work, there has been a move towards physicality and this was something I wanted to explore.

Simon Callery
Orange-WallPit Painting, 2016

Marcia Tucker wrote about Richard Tuttle for his exhibition at the Whitney in 1975… .So much of Tuttle’s work is a result of body activity that is partly caused by the fact that physical activity is the most direct and common means we have of translating interior states into external expression; in a very direct way, frowning, smiling, closed or open body positions, etc., are our primary means of communication, because they are experientially rather than analytically comprehensible. Our own experience of our bodies is “pre-­‐scientific,” primitive and immediate.

Katrin Bremermann
Twin Talk, 2016,
oil on canvas, 42 x 32 x 7 cm + 42 x 29 x 7 cm

In the late sixties, The ‘Supports and Surfaces’ movement focused on processes in painting essentially involved in the materiality and objecthood of the painting surface itself. They prioritised the importance of site and the reduction of painting to bare essentials, foregrounding the structural support of the stretcher for instance or leaving canvases bare or un-stretched, folded or suspended, tied off or draped. Obvious comparisons can be drawn to some of the work here today.

With shows at Cherry & Martin in Los Angeles followed by another at the Canada gallery in New York, both in 2014, the short lived movement has had somewhat of a resurgence although some might say, for many artists it never went away. Maybe for someone like Richard Tuttle this is true.

Sebastian Dannenberg

With shows such as  ENANTIODROMIA, also featuring Simon Callery, at the Fold gallery in 2014 and REAL PAINTING in 2015 at the Castlefield Gallery which was co-curated by Deb Covell and Jo McGonigal, it is plain to see that the ethos behind the Support/Surface movement is still very much alive.

Hernan Ardila
2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The list of artists showing here today has developed over time and with discussions between Martina and myself I feel it has evolved into a cohesive group that bounce playfully off one another whilst still asserting their own individuality. From the beginning we were keen for the exhibition to represent both UK and international artists and although they are from far afield there is a tangible collective consciousness.

Some you could say are more painterly and others more sculptural, though all consider themselves to be painters and continuing in the tradition of painting. Saying this, there is a will to break out of the conventions and free painting from the reigns of the canvas and frame, Off The Wall and into the space of the gallery.

Deb Covell,
red-submerged-forms

By removing the frame and therefore the image, painting is allowed to be matter and material. This move towards objectness raises the question of, what is the stuff that makes a painting, what is it made of and in turn this leads to decisions about the making and the process of construction. Whether it be the wood of the support, the canvas or the paint itself, each are treated equally and the emphasis is put on the materiality and physical nature of each component.

Jai Llewellyn, 2017

Kevin Finklea

Liadin Cooke – New Work Exhibition Views

Before me floats an Image 2017
plywood, gloss paint
Installation dimensions vary

                                                                                                                                                                      This body of work comes out of my current inquiry into tools, not merely as articles of utility but as implements that serve the human need to alter, adapt, create and destroy. Tools are both contrived and used for extending the force of man onto something, much like language, and the resulting marks of action that they can leave behind imply a residue of possession.

For most people the outcome of an action is what is important. However, this work is about constructing something that articulates the indication of a mark. In so doing, the significance of the action becomes disrupted, its intended outcome secondary, and its suggested implementation forces one into positing the question, ‘what made that and why?’

Based on drawings from an old photograph of a turf cutting with marks of the slane (a spade for cutting turf) clearly visible on the walls of the ditch, the elements of ‘Before me Floats an Image’ are the results of something pushed forward into being. They indicate a boundary, define a limit and are an absolute statement of fact and existence, they are a combination of the scars of removal, definition and intention – however much they hint at the unintelligible. The top layer pushes down and the bottom layers push upward creating a site of something that is neither recollection nor history, but that other place that mimics the act that it is based, in part, on. They are the objects of an act of thought or disappearance.

A spade is used to dig a hole and to thrust your way into the earth. A shovel moves something from one place to another. It used to be that every region in Ireland had its own shovel and spade makers, and each design was used for a particular place at a specific time of year. Some regions had as much as 250 different types of spades. This is a fascinating image of affinity with land and the considered craftsmanship of the tools people used to work it.

The wooden shapes of ‘Husbandmen’ made from walnut, are cut to the actual size of 6 different spades made in a small factory in County Tyrone, which closed down in the 1950’s. The rings in the wood mimic contours of the land they were made to work – with a sort of yearning nostalgia. The forms have the purity of modernism when art and architecture were together seen as one essential necessity in life, just at the time when the way people worked the land was undergoing its final transformation through to mechanisation.

The Untitled 1-8 watercolours show and fix that instant a missile is fired, when the ground turns to dust and light, and that formidable tool of destruction moves out of our sightline leaving a vacuum filled with anticipatory violence. ‘Like a Laughing String’ oscillates between the two opposite conditions of thought or action – in suspense, undecided and wavering.

These thoughts on tools and the link they have with language as a method of articulating intention, led to my making things that imply a demanding and purposeful activity. And in fact all this new work asks, ‘Why do we need and make things and how do we say this?

Liadin Cooke 2017                                                                                   www.liadincooke.com

Husbandmen
2014 – 2017, walnut
160 x 50 cm

Husbandmen

Like a Laughing String, 2017
lime wood, string, concrete
dimensions vary

Like a Laughing String, 2017

Like a Laughing String 2017

Before me floats an Image-study no 2 2017 Gouache on paper 102 x 72 cm

Untitled 1 – 8, 2017
watercolours
50 x 35 cm

Liadin Cooke New Work at RAUMX Preview Thursday 27.04.2017

 

Liadin Cooke,
Untitled 3, 2017
Watercolour on Paper

 

 

 

Liadin Cooke’s new work comes out of her enduring interest in language and materiality. Alongside this is her current inquiry into tools, not merely as articles of utility but as implements that serve the human need to alter, adapt, create and destroy. Tools are both contrived and used for extending the force of man onto something, and the resulting marks of action that they can leave behind imply a residue of possession.

For most people the result of an action is what is important. However, Cooke’s work is about constructing something that articulates the indication of a mark. In so doing, the importance of the action becomes disrupted, its intended outcome secondary, and its suggested implementation forces one into positing the question, ‘What made that mark and why?’.

Liadin Cooke Untitled 1, 2017

 

 

Liadin Cooke
Untitled 2, 2017

 

Irish born artist Liadin Cooke has lived in the UK since 1993. Shortlisted for the Northern Art prize in 2012, recent solo exhibitions include Nostos at noshowspace London [2014]and Holden at Huddersfield Art Gallery and at the Artists house, Roche court, Wiltshire [2010]. Other shows include Overlay: Sculpture & Drawing, Yorkshire Sculpture Park [2006], Ballroom (ornament), Henry Moore Institute, Leeds [2003]. Her work has been shown extensively in Europe and the USA. Cooke’s work is in public and private collections including: Dublin Corporation, Camden Council and the Henry Moore Institute.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Annebarbe Kau and Vincent Hawkins – Recent Works

With it’s last show for 2016 RAUMX is presenting two artists who are working with multi media.

German artist Annebarbe Kau constructs with wire, textile and string her drawings. For RAUMX she will also prepare a new sound installation. Kau has shown extensively in Germany and abroad.

British artist Vincent Hawkins is showing recent paintings and card board constructions. He lives in London and makes prints, paintings on canvas paper and card. He has shown extensively in Britain and abroad including solo shows in Chicago and Paris in recent years.

 

Vincent Hawkins 

Vincent Hawkins 2016

Vincent Hawkins 2016

Rarely is there a clear idea worked out in advance. I decide on materials and take it from there.  I work in a way that is improvisational through making, which I don’t see as an impoverishment of any kind. Beginning with a  mark or a form and proceed by responding to what is there before me. It is building in order to excavate. I think a lot of abstract artists work in this way because painting is composed of many different trajectories in collision and to try and identify origins and sources quickly leads to a sense of being tied up in knots. I like art that doesn’t try to necessarily look like anything. It doesn’t try to define meaning .

 “Meaning is something only for an individual, it has a home only in one person. The verb “to mean” implies something exists to be taken or learned from something else; and since subjects mean different things to every individual, meaning is purely subjective. Thus it is ‘subjective’ or should be understood to have an ‘anti-system’ or ‘anti-answer’ sensibility” Kierkegaard .

  Vincent Hawkins 2016

Vincent Hawkins, work on paper, 2016

Vincent Hawkins, work on paper, 2016

Annebarbe Kau

Annebarbe Kau

Annebarbe Kau

Along the line of

The General

In everyday life, lines supposedly give us “safety” and “orientation”, indicate or show us a direction, create connections and provide a basis– at least, we assume this to be so… And yes, as a matter of fact, in notebooks or on graph paper, the lines are already there, and our (western) culture then prescribes the direction (from top left to lower right). Even where there are no linear guidelines, the white, seemingly

bare, paper has been invisibly pre-formatted. This also applies to lines that flow together to form letters. – Perhaps it takes art, or more precisely, drawing to show us what possibilities of space are left at all.

The Haptic

The fall of the lines, their whirling, and their floating in a space they visually evoke themselves, their condensing, the dissolution of the surface, the highlighting the structure of the paper by the way the line has been laid out, the detachment from the paper, the flatness of what is actually a three-dimensional thread, cable or string, the lines seizing the space – all of this (and much more) are possible visual functions of the line in the work of Annebarbe Kau. For all of this, we still have not addressed the medium that provides such experience. However, the

descriptions already indicate we are scarcely referring to classically framed drawings here, (their mats placing them at a distance). Rather, it is about a completely haptic appearance of the line, articulated with the pages and in the materiality.

Stefan Gronert

Portrait Alles verkehrt

A artist portrait by Sabine Elsa Mueller in German only

annebarbe-kau-2

Annebarbe Kau

 

Ian Kane and Eric Cruikshank – September 2016

Ian Kane

Ian Kane is a spatial artist working from his studio in Dalcross, near Inverness in the Scottish Highlands. He has exhibited nationally and internationally since studying Sculpture at Edinburgh College of Art and completing a post-graduate degree in the 1970s. A Scottish Young Contemporaries Prize-winner in 1984, his works have been shown in the UK, Belgium, Netherlands, France, Norway, Canada and Japan.

Ian Kane, Seeing is believing

Ian Kane, Seeing is believing

 

‘Curiosity and the spirit of enquiry into what exists is always the starting point for the work. This preoccupation with reflecting the truth of the world and our place in it is the work of the artist. The work changes as we ourselves change. The artist strives to find ways to produce the works that become signifiers of our time. The making of every piece is a re-learning; the bringing together of the conscious and the unconscious. Memory does not help here as the presentness of the work generates its own problems to be resolved’

https://spark.adobe.com/page/wcrwajr059abC/

 

Eric Cruikshank

As to the situation of the colours, the purest and strongest must be placed in front of the piece, and the colouring varied according to subject, time and place. If the subject be grave, melancholy or terrible, the general tint of the colouring must incline to brown or black, or red and gloomy; but it must be gay and pleasant in subjects of joy or triumph.

Encyclopedia Britannica or A Dictionary of Arts and Sciences, edited by William Smellie, Edinburgh 1771

Eric Cruikshank  Number 9 -  Deep-Scarlet-Red-Pomplean-Red; 2016 Coloured Pencil on Paper, 19 cm x 28cm

Eric Cruikshank Number 9 – Deep-Scarlet-Red-Pomplean-Red; 2016 Coloured Pencil on Paper, 19 cm x 28cm

The Scottish artist Eric Cruikshank is a modern painter. Born in a country and into a culture with a strong narrative tradition, his work departs from customary figuration, yet revels in the craft and artisanship of his chosen medium. Instead of portraying famous men, it analyses the qualities of colour and light. Instead of imitating landscapes, it explores notions of painterly space. And instead of illustrating stories, it investigates the process of painting itself. More than anything, this approach relies on the individual viewer. Our perceptions of colour, light and space are not only dependent on the painting – they are just as much dependent on the conditions in which we perceive it. Changes in lighting, spatial arrangement, distance to the object, subjective mood of the beholder and even the time spent with the artwork, become constituting factors in understanding it. Instead of a mere consumer of a pre-packaged story, the beholder becomes participant observer.

 

Eric Cruikshank, Number 3; Light-Yellow-Glaze-Warm-Grey-II; 2016, Coloured Pencil on Paper; 19cm 28 cm.

Eric Cruikshank, Number 3; Light-Yellow-Glaze-Warm-Grey-II; 2016, Coloured Pencil on Paper; 19cm 28 cm.

CONTINUUM – Eric Cruikshank & Ian Kane- September 2016

Announcing the upcoming show with painter Eric Cruikshank and sculptor Ian Kane.

16.09 – 24.09.2016                                                                                                                                           Preview Thursday 15.09.2016               from 6 pm                                                                                     Opening times                                         Saturdays  2 – 6 pm                                                                                                                                        Mo – Fri.  by appointment                                                                                                                              T- 0207 2676267

 

Eric Cruikshank, Untitled, 2016

Eric Cruikshank, Untitled, 2016

Both artists are based in Scotland and have previously exhibited together.  In ‘Continuum’ we will see new works amongst other aspects shaped by the Scottish landscape and light.

Ian Kane, Seeing is believing

Ian Kane, Seeing is believing

Ian Kane

http://www.iankaneartist.com

The artist is a collector; fragments of seeing, ideas, observations, experience, accumulated knowledge eventually come together to form a visual reality.

The making of every piece is a re-learning, the bringing together of the conscious and the unconscious. Memory does not help here as the present (ness) of the work generates its own immediate problems to be resolved.

"work-will-set-you-free" , 2016

Ian Kane ,”work-will-set-you-free” , 2016

Curiosity and the spirit of enquiry into what exists is always the starting point of my work. This preoccupation with reflecting the truth of the world and our place in it is the work of the artist. The work changes as we ourselves change. The artist strives to find ways to produce works that become signifiers of our time. For me this process is constant research, the outcome becomes the work.

CONTINUUM RAUMX

My work tends to be contemplative in nature as a result of living in the landscape of the Scottish Highlands. I feel that this influence is in the mix giving the work a poetic quality.

Ian Kane

Ian Kane, Complete,2016

‘Complete’

The flat floor work started as a piece of plywood shuttering, which I found as flotsam on the banks of the Moray Firth. The white part, made from epoxy, exactly completes the work in every detail while still allowing difference. The work ever so slightly hovers above the floor.

‘Above and Below’

This piece is carved from a piece of cherry wood and is very precarious given the weight of the wood on top.

‘Work Will Set You Free’

The last floor work adds a note of humour to the show being a truly ridiculous object. The wheels are made of sandstone and the natural form that holds them in place is a piece of sycamore encased with resin. Although sycamore trees are seen often as weeds harp makers prize the wood.

Seeing is Believing’

The ‘Seeing is Believing’ piece has at its core a knowingness and an unknowingness, we know what the red covers but we also do not know. We see but we do not allow ourselves to believe.

 

Eric Cruikshank

http://www.ericcruikshank.com/

Untitled, 2016, Oil on Two Boards, 91.5cm x 156cm (with split).

Eric Cruikshank, Untitled, 2016 Oil on two Boards, 91.5 cm x 156 cm ( with split)

Eric Cruikshank, Untitled, 2016

Eric Cruikshank, Untitled, 2016

 

Taking landscape as an initial starting point, my paintings are not about literal presentation; instead the focus is on the emotive qualities of place. Using an objective palette tied to the Scottish landscape, colour acts as a vehicle to reveal the picture planes underlying points of reference. With the structure, design, and colour harmony being grounded in the everyday, the viewer is encouraged to readdress notions of their surroundings, where the familiar is opened up and made full of possibility.

With the works coming out of the territory of traditional art and values, through process and presentation, a dialogue opens up between the past and present, the historical and the contemporary. Despite an allusion to the social, spiritual and material contexts within the field of my art, the principal criteria always come back to the base construct elements. Shape, colour, and surface build the foundational support and elevate the works concepts, allowing the viewer to uncover layers of potential meaning as each element is considered. In the absence of imagery or narrative, the panels are left open to interpretation, as an almost blank plane to reflect the viewers own emotions and ideas.

By applying the paint in thinly layered colour bands, and utilising a subtraction technique, the surface is worked until a balance is reached. The delicate forms that remain give the effect of a monochromatic finish when first viewed. Through the resulting veil of paint, shimmering traces of tone flicker on the edge of focus, where the surface holds the gentlest luminosity and modulating volume. The works are completed with a meticulous level of control, creating a plane that bears no brush marks, removing evidence of the hand of the artist and any imprint of technique. With this removal, the colour field comes under closer scrutiny – on approaching the work, colour pulses in constantly shifting patterns, on withdrawing, these patterns blend, bleed and fuse into a vibrant continuous field, inviting a highly tuned visual attentiveness. The refined shade and contour lead the eye around the piece, gently engaging the viewer in the act of seeing, where their relationship with the work is one of continual change, as the ethereal surface vibrates with an inner light and rhythm that appears to expand outwards beyond the border, activating the space around and between the pieces

 

Peter Abrahams – Martin Streit, paintings and photography

Installation views RAUMX London    8.07 – 16.07.2016

opening times Saturday 2 – 6pm

and by appointment

raumx@mgeccelli1.plus.com

Preview – Thursday 7.07.2016

from 6 pm

Martin Streit and Peter Abrahams, installation, Raum X London, July 2016

Martin Streit and Peter Abrahams, installation, Raum X London, July 2016

Martin Streit and Peter Abrahams, installation, Raum X London, July 2016

Martin Streit and Peter Abrahams, installation, Raum X London, July 2016

Martin Streit and Peter Abrahams, installation, Raum X London, July 2016

Martin Streit and Peter Abrahams, installation, Raum X London, July 2016

Martin Streit and Peter Abrahams, installation, Raum X London, July 2016

Martin Streit and Peter Abrahams, installation, Raum X London, July 2016

Martin Streit and Peter Abrahams, installation, Raum X London, July 2016

Martin Streit and Peter Abrahams, installation, Raum X London, July 2016

Martin Streit and Peter Abrahams, installation, Raum X London, July 2016

Martin Streit and Peter Abrahams, installation, Raum X London, July 2016