In and Out – spatial correspondence – RAUMX forthcoming group show on lens based art May 2016

In and out5-hoch Thursday

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The exhibition In and Out – spatial correspondences- is primarily presenting photographic positions dealing with the question of the factual and the actual.

To what extent can a photograph embody  characteristics of sculpture or painting?When does the photograph become the medium for painterly or sculptural strategies and vice versa? This theme  is illuminated from different angles by using some real objects and sculptures which are placed between surface and space .

Philipp Dorl -Slit-back

Philipp Dorl ,Slit-back

 

 

 

Martina Geccelli,  Stone 2. 2015

Martina Geccelli,
Stone 2. 2015

Darren Harvey -Regan,  The Erratics 10

Darren Harvey -Regan,
The Erratics 10

Tamara Lorenz, Rot1

Tamara Lorenz,
Rot1

Michael Moerk, White

Michael Moerk,
White

David penny, Do you think it will be like this forever, 2016

David Penny,
Do you think it will be like this forever, 2016

 

 

 

 

 

Nancy Murphy Spicer – more than momentary: ENJOY

Installation shots from Preview Thursday 5.11.2015Hanging Drawing (20 successive drawings, unique and unrehearsed), 2015, lead, rubber, acrylic, hardware, dimensions variable
Hanging Drawing (20 successive drawings, unique and unrehearsed), 2015, lead, rubber, acrylic, hardware, dimensions variable

IMG_2170

 

 

 

 

 

More than momentary: ENJOY, 2015 Installation view with 21 drawings.

More than momentary: ENJOY, 2015 Installation view with 21 drawings. (gesso, gouache and acrylic with collage on rice paper)

 

more than momentary: ENJOY alters the typical path of artwork from studio to gallery to collector by offering voluntary participants the opportunity to borrow and spend extended time with the work BEFORE the exhibition. In the spirit of Lewis Hyde’s ideas about art as a gift, I offer this time with the work as a gift, as a way of opening up the possibilities for relating to the work in a way that is more than momentary. The choice of the wordENJOY in the title refers to the secondary meaning of the word: “to possess or benefit from.”

Nancy Murphy Spicer, 2015

12182627_10206704381981569_2043038151047410976_o

Disrupted Drawing Large, 2015, gesso, gouache and acrylic with collage on rice paper,

IMG_2171

Disrupted Drawing, 2015

 

12191087_10206704382101572_3860975286928581005_o

Hanging Drawing, participatory performance, 2015

 

Nancy Murphy Spicer – more than momentary: ENJOY

Disrupted Drawing Small 50, 2015 gouache +acrylic with collage on rice paper, 46.5 x 48,5cm

Disrupted Drawing
Small 50, 2015
gouache +acrylic with collage on rice paper, 46.5 x 48,5cm

 

Disrupted Drawing Small 50 ; in situ

Disrupted Drawing Small 50 ; in situ

“When you are in the groove, the work is telling you what it wants. It’s about what the work wants.” — Richard Tuttle

”A work of art can survive without the market, but where there is no gift, there is no art.” — Lewis Hyde, The Gift

 

 

 

 

 

Nancy Murphy Spicer’s works are physical and collaborative drawings and performances which activate social, architectural and geographic space. Her work poses questions such as what is the nature of beauty, who creates it, and how do we notice the moment when art occurs.

For the RaumX exhibtion, Murphy Spicer presents a series of works on paper, a drawing installation and an artists book documenting a participatory, curatorial project.

Nancy Murphy Spicer’s Disrupted Drawings prize an intentionally casual process. In creating them, assumptions about the final work are set aside and the generously built surface reveals the narrative of the making. Rice paper, acrylic and gouache come together in a drawing object that encompasses painting, sculpture and drawing.

In the spirit of Lewis Hyde’s ideas about art as a gift, Murphy Spicer initiated a participatory, curatorial project for her exhibition at RaumX entitled more than momentary: ENJOY. She enaged an international group of 23 volunteers to borrow and spend extended time with the Disrupted Drawings before the exhibition. It was her intention that, with this temporary possession of the work, participants would derive pleasures and benefits that surpass the typically brief exhibition and/or online viewing experience. An artists book documents the project in photos and text and will be on view at RaumX.

Murphy Spicer’s Hanging Drawing 2 (20 successive drawings unique and unrehearsed) is dependent on a slightly different “gift” scenario. In this work, beholders engage with the work to create a series of drawings using the substantial, dimensional line that comprises the work. Made of lead, rubber, and paint, the line hangs on the wall, draped across a series of small hooks, its weight creating catenary arcs toward the floor. A set of simple instructions is provided as guidelines for engagement. At the RaumX opening, a selected group of individuals will perform the work, each making their unique set of twenty fleeting drawings.

American artist Nancy Murphy Spicer, formerly based in London, lives and works in Charlottesville, Virginia, USA.

Her work is represented by Carroll and Sons, Boston, Massachusetts.

www.murphyspicer.com

www.carrollandsons.net/artists/spicer/

Hanging Drawing, 20 successive drawings , unique and unrehearsed, 2015. Lead,rubber,acrylic, hardware; dimensions variable

Hanging Drawing, 20 successive drawings , unique and unrehearsed, 2015. Lead,rubber,acrylic, hardware; dimensions variable

Hanging Drawing, 2015 (as above)

Hanging Drawing, 2015
(as above)

 

 

 

James Geccelli – Recent Paintings and Works on Paper

“Strictly speaking, there are no elements of painting in Geccelli’s pictures. What could count as the most basic building block always proves to be undivided, changeable, instable. Geccelli’s work begins before simplicity, since what is visible is not yet separated and hence not yet brought back together… The line no longer bears witness exclusively to perception, but also to bodily movement… The line is therefore not elementary, but instead a phenomenon of indifference that only afterwards branches into what is seen and what is drawn, into the visual and the corporeal. It is similarly the case with the ground. Therefore, it is much too simple to presume that the ground is a given and stable entity. Without doubt, the painter first levels out and primes the picture medium, but he also paints over the colour lines again with white, to such an extent that their graphical and coloration effects are more or less strongly muted. For Geccelli, then, establishing a ground not only means preparing a surface for the drawing; it is equally important that the drawing can again sink into this ground. The foundation of painting is also its veil… and we also sense the risk of neutralisation associated with the use of this colour. It is precisely this risk that Geccelli seeks: For it alone also allows a new picture to be painted.” (Ralph Ubl, University of Chicago)

O.T. 2014

O.T. 2014

James Geccelli – Recent Paintings. Forthcoming show at RAUMX London

Berlin based artist James Geccelli is showing his recent paintings and works on paper.

“ There are different layers of paint on a surface that we call a painting. These specific paintings are a result of an investigation to isolate or claim different periods of time to hold on to an instance of awareness to rescue it from the neutralizing effect of daily life’s continuum .        They are moments of perceptions.” J.G.

www.james-geccelli.de

James Geccelli O.T. 2015

James Geccelli
O.T. 2015

Left: O.T. work on paper, 2015 Right: O.T. oil on canvas, 2015

Left: O.T. work on paper, 2015
Right: O.T. oil on canvas, 2015

O.T. oil on canvas, 2015

O.T. oil on canvas, 2014

 

Sigune Hamann Mayday – forthcoming show at RAUMX London from 3.07.2015

Sigune Hamann Mayday

Sigune Hamann is an artist whose work encompasses photography and video. At RAUMX, the artist presents new photographic work shot on May 1st at Trafalgar Square in London. Hamann focuses on the moment when a common goal directs crowds in common movement and assertion. Film-strip (London 1.5.2015) is part of her ongoing series film-strips, which captures trajectories of bodies and lights in motion in panoramic images. A whole roll of 35 mm film is exposed in an analogue photographic camera in one continuous rewinding movement while moving (walking or turning) herself. In photographic film-strips Sigune Hamann traces the dynamics of urban environments. As a trace of the rally, the film-strip carries its dynamic, memory and emotion.

Hamann’s work deals with the passing of time in the fixing of an image and the perception and recollection of events. As part of her residencies at the V&A and Tokyo Wonder Site she is taking film-strips and testing how they can be displayed and experienced in different architectural contexts. Her solo exhibition ‘In the name of’ at Durham Art Gallery (October 2013) featured a 56 metre film-strip installation. Recent projects include ‘wave’ (Wellcome Collections, London, 2012), ‘Whitehall’ (ISEA, Istanbul Biennale, 2011),’ Stillness and Movement’, (Tate Conference 2010), ‘the walking up and down bit’ (BFI, 2009), ‘undercurrent’ (Kunsthalle Mainz) and ‘short time space’ (Gallery of Photography, Dublin, 2008).

London based artist Sigune Hamann is a reader in art and media practice at the University of the Arts London.

www.sigune.co.uk

may-klein

Film-Strip ( Mayday), 2015 detail Photographic film-strip taken on 01.05.2015

Film-strip (Harajuku, Tokyo) Photographic film-strip, 380 x 87 cm; 180 x 41 cm 2002

A very short space of time through short times of space, 7.14 x 3.59m
 Diorama installation as part of a solo exhibition Gallery of Photography Dublin 2008

In transit (Tokyo) Series of photographs of commuters at Shibuya Station 2010

In transit (Tokyo)
Series of photographs of commuters at Shibuya Station
2010

Blown off roof, Tatekawa Series of photographs, 57 x 38 cm  2014

Blown off roof, Tatekawa
Series of photographs, 57 x 38 cm
2014

Heiner Blumenthal Space Spy – Construction and dissolution

One thing at a time. But before I begin to write about Heiner Blumenthal’s pictures, I ought to mention that they are very big – and light. They even look light, because they are not totally covered in paint, let alone a ground, but bear just lines and structures in limited colours, sometimes only in black. As far as transport and installation are concerned, they are pictures – canvas, frames and so on. But seeing them on the wall, one does wonder whether they really are pictures, given their lack of ground and colour. On the one hand, there is the panel painting in its nakedness; on the other, those lines and bundles of lines in their heterogeneity. Not painted pictures, but frameworks and signs assembled on the raw material of the picture. “Scenario” or’,’field of action” is how one might describe the painted parts if that didn’t immediately renrind one of war reporting. So maybe it would be better to think in terms of “situations”.                                                                           So Blumenthal’s sign constructs are far from being paintings. Yet they would be inconceivable outside the pictures. The canvasses are designated as pictures. The detail is invested with its own logic because it undermines the composition. Illusionism is evoked, yet quite willingly diverts its power of persuasion onto the abstract surface. As if the situational moment were appointing itself to be the picture. “The detours of technology, the linearity of the mind” is how Moholy-Nagy described such artistic incidents. But now we must get to the point, and discuss what is in the actual pictures (the exhibited ones) – if I view the enormous pictures as a kind of comic. I can see scaffolding, constructions, aerials, tentacles and struts. Are we supposed to feel as if we are caught inside huge space laboratories or in a microcosmic chain of molecules? Or should we stay put within the artistic environment of El Lissitzky’s “prouns”? You can never be sure with all these floating “architectons”. With protean energy, they first appear as giant Mondrianesque lattices, then as constructional slogans. Since they keep shifting between a static and a dynamic method, they can never be pinned down as enlarged quotations.                                                                                                                                      What one finally sees is a criss-cross of lines – rather like chinoiserie and trellising – which in the eyes of the dazzled art historian suggest the crossed swords of the Meissen porcelain emblem.                                                                                                                         Heiner Blumenthal’s way of counteracting the threat of an aesthetically teasing or exalted construct has recently been to introduce scattered blotches which imbue the constructive genre with a certain blurredness, or just simply with life. The result is an org

anic but dangerous balance. For what previously had had the appearance of a framework, now undergoes a metamorphosis into a compactable concertina barrier. However, what looks amorphous switches over to a subversive “basso continuo”. Let’s stop looking for more certainty. The feeling of “entering” already contains all that’s important.                              Veit Loers (Kassel., 19.2.1991)

Installation views
3 ink drawings - O.T.  2008 - 2015- left wall 29,7 x21 cm

3 ink drawings – O.T.
2008 – 2015- left wall
29,7 x21 cm

4 ink drawings, O.T. 29,7 x 21 cm  2008 - 2015

4 ink drawings, O.T.
29,7 x 21 cm
2008 – 2015

Blumenthal 3 etchings- O.T.        2013 68 x 42 cm ; Edition of 12

Blumenthal 3 etchings- O.T. 2013
68 x 42 cm ; Edition of 12

Painting - 2000 Etching 2013

Painting NO TITLE O.T.- 2000
Etching O.T. 2013